Umbraco Deploy
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Installing Umbraco Deploy

In this article, we will cover the steps in order for you to install and configure Umbraco Deploy on a new or existing website.

Prerequisites

Ensure to first read and follow the setup guides for either new or existing projects below:
New project
Here we will cover how to install and set up Umbraco Deploy on a new website.
Requirement
  • Visual Studio 2017 v15.9.6 or later
  • Umbraco Deploy license
  • SQL Server Database
Set up the Git repository and Umbraco project
The first step to get Umbraco Deploy up and running is to set up a GitHub repository. This will be where source code is stored, and, following the GitHub actions example, act as our environment where we will set up a CI/CD pipeline.
  1. 1.
    Using the Visual Studio template, set up a Github repository with a .gitignore file.
  2. 2.
    Clone down the repository to your local machine.
  3. 3.
    Create a new Umbraco project.
  4. 4.
    Run the project.
  5. 5.
    Choose to use a custom SQL connection string pointing to your local database.
  6. 6.
    Commit the files so they are ready to be pushed up once we have set up the build server.
When Umbraco has been installed in a repository, we can continue to install and configure Umbraco Deploy in the project.
Existing project
Here we will cover the steps in order for you to install Umbraco deploy on your already existing website with content.
We will cover how to install and set up Umbraco deploy on your website and how to generate the UDA files based on your production website's database.
Requirement
  • Visual Studio 2017 v15.9.6 or later
  • Umbraco Deploy license
  • Copy of your production site's database
  • Copy of views, CSS, and scripts folder from production
Step 1: Install Umbraco Deploy on Existing site
To install Umbraco Deploy on an existing site there are additional steps that need to be taken so Umbraco Deploy can run with your website. On an existing Umbraco website, there is already a set of Document Types, Templates, and Data Types with IDs in the database. In order for Umbraco Deploy to work with your website, you will need to make sure that these IDs are in sync between the different environments that you want to add to your setup.
  1. 1.
    Make a copy of the database on the production site.
  2. 2.
    Download your /Views folder as well as the folders holding your css files and scripts.
When the production database, folder, and files have been copied down, it's time to set up a git repository and a new Umbraco project.
Step 2: Set up Git repository and Umbraco project
The next step to get Umbraco Deploy up and running is to set up a repository and install Umbraco into it.
  1. 1.
    Set up a repository with a .gitignore file using the Visual Studio template.
  2. 2.
    Clone down the repository to your local machine.
  3. 3.
    Create a new Umbraco project.
  4. 4.
    Use the copy of your production Database when setting up the database for the empty project.
  5. 5.
    Add the /Views folder as well as the folders holding your css files and scripts.
  6. 6.
    Commit the files so they are ready to be pushed up once you have set up the build server.
  7. 7.
    Run the project.
When Umbraco has been installed in a repository, we can continue to install and configure Umbraco Deploy in the project.

Source Control Configuration

After the Umbraco files have been committed add the following lines to the .gitignore so that they will not be picked up by Git when we are deploying.
**/media/*
# Umbraco deploy specific
**/umbraco/Deploy/deploy*
The deploy-specific update here will ensure that temporary files generated by Deploy during its operations will not be included in source control.
Make sure that the updates to the .gitignore file are also committed.

Installing and Configuring Umbraco Deploy

When Umbraco has been installed in a repository, we can install Umbraco Deploy in the project.
To install Umbraco Deploy, run dotnet add package Umbraco.Deploy.OnPrem from the command line or Install-Package Umbraco.Deploy.OnPrem from the package manager console in Visual Studio.
To be able to use Umbraco Forms with Umbraco Deploy, you need to install the Umbraco.Deploy.Forms package as well.
In order to deploy content based on certain rich core and community property editors - including Nested Content, Multi URL Picker and Block List/Grid Editor - there is one further NuGet package to install: Umbraco.Deploy.Contrib.
With Umbraco Deploy installed, to use it in the project you will need to create and add configuration for an API key/secret.
For improved security, it is recommended to set the ApiSecret (instead of the ApiKey) setting to a cryptographically random value of 64 bytes. Using Base64-encoding to get the string representation, will result in a value of 88 characters. For versions prior to Deploy 12 or when not using the API secret setting, the recommendation is to set the ApiKey to a randomly generated string of 64 characters.
Generate and set API key (deprecated)
You can use the following C# code to generate the API key:
using System;
using System.Security.Cryptography;
byte[] secret = new byte[32];
RandomNumberGenerator.Create().GetBytes(secret);
var apiKey = new StringBuilder(secret.Length * 2);
for (int i = 0; i < secret.Length; i++)
{
apiKey.AppendFormat("{0:X2}", secret[i]);
}
Console.Write(apiKey.ToString());
Or by running the following PowerShell command:
$secret = [byte[]]::new(32); [System.Security.Cryptography.RandomNumberGenerator]::Create().GetBytes($secret); return -join ($secret | %{ '{0:X2}' -f $_ })
This same Deploy API key must be used on each environment for the website.
We strongly recommend generating different keys for different websites/projects.
The key should be applied in appsettings.json:
{
"Umbraco": {
"Deploy": {
"Settings": {
"ApiKey": "<your API key here>",
}
}
}
}

Configuring Environments

Once the API secret has been added, it is now time to configure the environments, also in the appsettings.json file.
An example configuration with a single upstream environment file will look like this:
{
"Umbraco": {
"Deploy": {
"Settings": {
"ApiSecret": "<your API secret here>"
},
"Project": {
"CurrentWorkspaceName": "Live",
"Workspaces": [
{
"Id": "efef5e89-a19b-434b-b68a-26e022a0ad52",
"Name": "Live",
"Type": "live",
"Url" :"https://localhost:44307"
}
]
}
}
}
}
The setting under Project:CurrentWorkspaceName should match the Name provided in the list of Workspaces that match the current environment. Using this Umbraco Deploy will indicate the correct current environment on the "Workspaces" dashboard.
In Umbraco Deploy 9, this value was set using the configuration key Debug:EnvironmentName. Although included under a "Debug" section, this setting is required for the installations of Umbraco Deploy on-premises (i.e. other than on Umbraco Cloud). Hence why it was moved to the "Project" section in Umbraco Deploy 10.
Expected values for Type are "development", "staging" or "live". These settings are required, though strictly only for the latter is it necessary to use the specific value of "live", so other values can be used if you have more than these three environments.
You will need to generate a unique GUID for each environment. This can be done in Visual Studio:
  1. 1.
    Open "Tools".
  2. 2.
    Select "Create GUID".
  3. 3.
    Use the Registry Format.
  4. 4.
    Copy the GUID into the id value.
  5. 5.
    Generate a "New GUID" for each environment you will be adding to your setup.
Or by running the following PowerShell command:
[guid]::NewGuid().ToString()
The URL configured for each environment should be the root URL for the website and needs to be accessible by the other environments over HTTPS.

Validating Source Control

Once the configuration has been set up with the correct information we can now go ahead and make sure that the source control is including our files in the /umbraco/Deploy folder of our Umbraco project.
This can be done by going to the /umbraco/Deploy/Revision folder of the project and create a test .uda file, and then check in either your Git GUI or in the command line and verify whether the test file is being tracked.
Test UDA file
We can see that the file has been created and it is being tracked by Git and we can go ahead and delete the test file.
Now that Umbraco Deploy has been installed on the project, we can go ahead and commit the files to the repository.
Do not push the files up yet as a CI/CD build server will first need to be set up and connected to our repository.

Include your Umbraco Deploy license file

Before moving on to setting up the build server, make sure that your license is included in your project.
For Umbraco Deploy On-Premise, this will be a key provided to you when taking out your subscription to the product. It should be added to your configuration at the key Umbraco:Licenses:Umbraco.Deploy.OnPrem.
For example, in appsettings.json:
"Umbraco": {
"CMS": {
...
},
"Licenses": {
"Umbraco.Deploy.OnPrem": "<your license key>"
},
"Deploy": {
...
}
Umbraco Cloud projects use a license file placed in the /umbraco/Licenses folder that is provided when your project is created.
Read more about the Umbraco Deploy licensing model.